Wisconsin deploys National Guard as police shooting of Black man sparks unrest


Article content continued

Evers, a Democrat, condemned what he called the “excessive use of force and immediate escalation when engaging with Black Wisconsinites.” He announced the special session next Monday for legislators to consider legislation introduced months ago to improve police accountability and eliminate dangerous practices.

“We must rise to this movement and this moment and meet it with our empathy, our humanity and a fierce commitment to disrupt the cycle of systemic racism and bias that devastates Black families and communities,” Evers said in a public address.

Pete Deates, president of the city’s police union, the Kenosha Professional Police Association, said Evers was “wholly irresponsible” for rushing to judgment, and asked the public to wait until all facts are known.

The shooting occurred three months after the death of George Floyd, a Black man, in Minneapolis police custody sparked nationwide protests against police brutality and structural racism in the United States.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the Democrat challenging Republican President Donald Trump in the Nov. 3 election, on Monday called for the officers to be held accountable.

“And this morning, the nation wakes up yet again with grief and outrage that yet another Black American is a victim of excessive force,” Biden said in a statement. “These shots pierce the soul of our nation.”

CROWDS MARCH

Close to 200 members of the Wisconsin National Guard will soon be deployed on Monday to Kenosha, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters, as the city set a curfew for a second night starting from 8 p.m. until 7 a.m CDT on Tuesday (0100 to 1200 GMT on Tuesday).

tinyurlis.gdv.gdv.htu.nuclck.ruulvis.netshrtco.detny.im